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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownwnersp rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and radio stations within a given community. and that means people are jujus not going to be hearing different points of view. >> i brought with me a story from "the new york times" that drives home the point you're making. it begins with a dateline out of san angelo, texas. "call a reporter at the cbs television station here, and it might be an anchor for the nbc station who calls back. or it might be the news director who runs
hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first freely-elected president. after riot police gave up keeping the two warring sides apart. seven people were killed and hundreds were injured. both sides were armed with clubs, but eyewitnesses said the first gunfire came from president morsi's supporters. the president's opponents let off fireworks. but they say they won't back down until the president gives up sweeping new powers or resigns. this morning, the army moved in. not to mount a military coup, but to defend a president they would once have jailed for his political views. the commander of these troops said these tanks were just to keep rival factions apart. but if mr. morsi can trigg
, or alec. >> alec is a nationwide consortium of elected state legislators working side-by-side with some of america's most powerful corporations. they have an agenda you should know about, a mission to remake america, changing the country by changing its laws one state at a time. alec creates what it calls "model legislation," pro-corporate laws like this one, that its members push in statehouses across the nation. alec says close to a thousand bills, based at least in part on its models, are introduced every year. and an average of 200 pass. this has been going on for decades. but somehow, alec managed to remain the most influential corporate-funded political organization you'd never heard of -- until a gunshot sounded in the florida night. >> trayvon martin unarmed but for a bag of candy and iced tea that he was carrying. >> you'll recall that the shooter in trayvon martin's death was protected at first by florida's so-called stand-your-ground law. that law was the work of the national rifle association. there's its lobbyist standing right beside governor jeb bush when he signed it int
. it wasn't simply the election return, re-election of the president. but today the associated press poll came out, job ratings at 57%, the president. other than the blip that he got after the navy seals operation against osama bin laden, that is the highest in three and a half years. the republican brand as a party remains an albatross around people's necks and the republicans have seen throughout this debate as people who are apparently willing to raise taxes on 98% of americans in order to shelter the 2% for paying any more. and i just think that argument and the dynamics politically against them there is a sense of inevitability that the rates are going to go. i agree with david on the necessary door-- necessity of a delicate touchlt i don't think john boehner has control over his caucus right now. i'm not sure he can sell a tax increase, even if it does involve entitlement taming of the spending of future spending on entitlements. i think he's in a tough bind. i think they have the goodwill but i'm not sure the votes. >> woodruff: you're saying the president in your mind clearly has
change. elections happen. there are consequences to those elections. yes, i think you'll see a different product come out. but i think the key is you're going to see a balanced approach with both revenue and spending cuts. you're going to see at least $4 trillion because that is the minimum amount you have to reduce the deficit in order to stabilize the debt and get it on a downward path as a percent of g.d.p. >> ifill: you said a moment ago that this is theater. these are both like opening bids that either side is going to reject. how do we get past that? how do they get past that if, in fact, the catastrophe everyone is warning about is to be avoided. >> if they got to agreement the way washington is too quickly, their own side would just kill 'em because they wouldn't think they had negotiated hard enough. you know, they've got to go through this exchange. this is no different than when, you know, you list your house, you know, you put up one price, somebody comes in with a lower price, you kind of reach a middle ground. the thing i'm sure of is that we got to end up with at least $4
're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group
's just been consolidating the big run it has had and will eventually go higher. bons i think with the re-election of president obama it pretty much insurances you will have low-interest rates for the next 18 to 24 months at least on the shored end of the yield curve. but i think bonds you need to have a very specific idea in terms of investing the fixed income side of your asset allocation because i don't know how much below 0 interest rates can go. and if the economy starts to get better, i think interest rates will go up. >> all right. given us a lot to think b jeff, as always, thank you so much. jeff saut, chief investment strategist at raymond james. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: "special." with more companies announcing special dividends: just how special are they? >> tom: more companies joined the end of year rush today to pay shareholders a one-time "special" dividend or move up 2013 payouts. the actions reward investors with an extra check before tax rates likely increase in 2013. late today oracle accelerated cash payments from next year's second, third, and fourth q
a lot to address the fiscal situation. >> no it's just ridiculous. i mean these are our elected representatives and they have got to pay a little more attention to those that got them in the office. and they're arguing amongst themselves without much care about the people they represent. >> tom: a lot of those folks are retiree, we have a question from anita asking what is the investing or financial planning lesson paul use most during retirement? >> well, the number one is hope i can live my life to the last and still have enough capital to keep me going. and a lot of investors are running up against the same thing. they're running out of capital because yields are so low in the bond market, money markets are yielding practically nothing. so they have to chip into their base capital and that is hurt. so what i am doing is looking for blue-chip stocks with decent dividends. >> susie: a lot of people are wondering that in this climate what do you think is going to be the new investment opportunity available to all of us in 2013. s this's a question from fay. >> new investment opp
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)